are sequels where it’s at? or was milk a bad choice?

The Action Four News Team will assemble again

It’s the sequel everyone has been talking about.

When Will Ferrell turned up on Conan O’Brien recently dressed as alter-ego Ron Burgundy playing jazz flute, I could feel the excited anticipation building in my stomach. After hilariously insulting Conan’s appearance, he came out with this:

“I want to announce this to everyone here in the Americas. To our friends in Spain, Turkey and the U.K. including England, that as of 0900 Mountain Time, Paramount Pictures and myself, Ronald Joseph Aaron Burgundy, have come to terms on a sequel to Anchorman. It is official! There will be a sequel to Anchorman.”

Twitter went off after the announcement, with many tweeting their excitement about the sequel using classic Anchorman lines, like “@Bozie42 There will be an anchorman sequel! I’m not even mad, that’s amazing. #imronburgundy?”.

I have to admit, I’m pretty excited as original cast members, Steve Carrell and Paul Rudd be returning (no word yet on David Koechner and Christina Applegate though their agents have expressed their desire to be apart of it). Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy is one of my all-time favourite films and is one of the most quotable movies around (probably on par with Mean Girls). “Milk was a bad choice” anyone?

But as excited as I am about it, it also got me wondering, why does everything seem to be a sequel these days? And I’m not just talking about book-to-movie-series like The Hunger Games and Twilight. Most money-making films have been made into sequels along the way. Last week alone the eighth instalment (including the spin-offs) in the American Pie series was released in theatres across the world.

There are so many Pirates movies, you need an actual treasure chest to store them all

And American Pie is not the only one. Coming up there is Men In Black 3, Dumb & Dumber 2, Triplets (the sequel to Schwarzenegger’s classic Twins), rumours of a Wedding Crashers 2 and a reboot of The Three Stooges. Not to mention other film series such as the million and one Police Academy movies, Legally Blonde and Miss Congeniality. Disney is a serial offender with multiple made-for-TV films along with what seems like the never ending Pirates of the Caribbean (who knew someone other than Tim Burton would film Johnny Depp in ultimately the same character so many times).  And don’t even get me started on Ice Age. Even action flicks like Lara Croft’s Tomb Raiderare all serialised. It seems that Hollywood can’t let go of a good idea.

I understand the reasoning behind it, if a movie makes lots of money at the box office, it’s only natural for studio execs to think that maybe they’re onto a good thing and they can fatten their wallets even more by releasing another film, with minimal effort and an already established back-story. And for the most part, it works because of a wonderful little thing called curiosity.

Whether or not you’ve convinced yourself that the sequel will be rubbish, there’s a little part of you that will still go and see it at the movies “just in case” it’s as good as the original. On the other hand, if it really is rubbish, word-of-mouth reviews quickly get around telling you not to waste your money, and the film ends up being a flop.

While many have been excited about the Anchorman sequel, many are worried it won’t live up to the greatness of the first.  “@SidDiamond Anchorman 2 will be a disappointment. Has there ever been a sequel to a comedy that was even remotely funny?”

But I’m pretty optimistic about the Anchorman sequel. Why? Because it’s been eight years since the first was released. This matters because they’ve had adequate time to develop a decent storyline, I hope. Plus, I’m really excited to see the Action Four News Team back in action. But we still have awhile to wait with the release date slated for 2013.

Are you excited about the Anchorman sequel? Do you think too many films are made into series?

Originally published on Kiki & Tea.

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